Launch

Conflict or cooperation? Looking back at the EiP

The Final Event Three years into the life cycle of this Mayor’s London Plan – although the next election looms before we can be sure about its final form. It is time now to shift gear – from critiquing ‘his’ Plan to thinking about collaborative ways of improving outcomes from the process and finding a way of ‘failing better’ with the next one. In this final event we concentrate mainly on housing… Read More

Learning from Bridport: the wider benefits of cohousing in the UK

LSE London’s Kath Scanlon, together with Melissa Fernández Arrigoitia (Lancaster University), Jim Hudson (UCL), and Swaiba Saeed (LSE) conducted a research project for Bridport Cohousing in Dorset. The report, entitled ‘The wider benefits of cohousing: the case of Bridport’, explores how Bridport can be expected to benefit its wider neighbourhood and community. Linking this case study to the broader literature, the authors hope the lessons will be relevant to prospective developments elsewhere… Read More

The ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’: our report for The Family Building Society

The ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ is now among the top ten lenders in the country. But research by LSE London, led by Kath Scanlon, shows how little it operates like a bank. The report, ‘The Bank of Mum and Dad: How it really works‘, emphasises that for most families the process is very informal, and people find it very difficult to talk about money. Often it is not clear whether there… Read More

More homes in less space: living in high-density housing in London

by Kath Scanlon, Fanny Blanc and Tim White December 2018 London has historically been a low-rise city of terraced houses and private gardens, but if it is to accommodate its rapidly growing population without impinging on the Green Belt (as Mayor Sadiq Khan has promised), then new homes must necessarily be built at higher densities. This densification is recognised as inevitable and indeed is an explicit policy target. Densification is an important… Read More

Planning risk and development, our report on planning certainty for RTPI

In late October, Kath Scanlon talked to the Highbury Group about our research undertaken for the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) by LSE London and the Bartlett School of Planning (UCL) to the past presidents of the Institute. The report, Planning risk and development: how greater planning certainty would affect residential development, is part of the RTPI’s ‘Better Planning’ programme. The context to this work was the pledge the Government made in… Read More

Rent controls: lessons from international experience

Yesterday, the Residential Landlords Association published a new LSE London report by Christine Whitehead and Peter Williams on changes in rent regulation in a number of countries (click here to view report). The starting point for this research was the growing concern about whether the private rented sector is suitable for its growing role as a mainstream tenure especially given the large numbers of family households that are now living there. One… Read More

Will the private rented sector continue to grow? Our report for Shelter

Current forecasts suggest that perhaps one in four households in England, and one in three in London, might be living in the private rented sector by 2025. However there have also been signs that growth is slowing—as indicated by the black line on the figure below, which has flattened since 2012. In this context, Shelter asked us to look at possible future scenarios for the private rented sector [1]. To view or… Read More

A poor tax – Council tax in London: Time for reform

Is council tax ‘too difficult to touch’ when it comes to reform? Perhaps the conversation carries with it much political baggage, hence its avoidance in political circuits, but a recent interim report argues this conversation is a critical one to have. The report, entitled A poor tax – Council tax in London: time for reform, was published by the Institute for Public Policy Research and authored by Luke Murphy, Charlotte Snelling, and… Read More

London 2030 and Beyond, a report by the King’s Commission on London, chaired by Tony Travers

On 18 March 2018, the Policy Institute at King’s College launched a report entitled, London 2030 and Beyond. The report was compiled by the King’s Commission on London which examined two under reviewed issues that are central to London’s civic life – namely: health and skills (further education and training). The Commission was jointly chaired by Director of LSE London Tony Travers, and Lord (Andrew) Adonis, Visiting Professor at King’s College London and… Read More

Migration out of London mainly impacts around the edge of the South East

LSE London’s Ian Gordon and Christine Whitehead, with population geographer Tony Champion, and housing specialist Neil McDonald have newly published research arguing that, with tight constraints on housing development in the ring around London, impacts of growing demand for space inside the city are channeled out to the  more distant parts of the Wider South East (WSE), and a fringe belt beyond that. They also point to the underlying roles of rising… Read More