Recent News

Why Pocket works: size may not matter when it comes to affordable housing

Site profile: Pocket. By Katia Habra and Theadora Trindle, LSE MSc Regional and Urban Planning Studies, 2014-15. As average house prices continue to grow in London, reaching £514,000 last September, younger Londoners are not only being priced out of the city, but must now delay – and often abandon – any hopes of ever accessing the property ladder. Meanwhile, with election season in full swing, housing has been targeted as a priority campaign… Read More

Prefab is Back in Town

Site profile: Y:Cube. By Theadora Trindle and Benjamin Walch, LSE MSc Regional and Urban Planning Studies, 2014-15. London is in the throes of a housing supply crisis, we all know this by now. What is less known is how to address it in a way that produces new stock quickly, efficiently and of high quality. While often overlooked, there is a precedent in London’s history for doing this successfully: the use of… Read More

Learning from live/work

Site profile: Bow Arts Live/Work Units By Benjamin Walch and Rodrigo Peon-Veiga, LSE MSc Regional and Urban Planning Studies, 2014-15 Funding arts locally while providing artists with affordable living and working space can sound like a utopian vision. But in 2007, an encounter between the Bow Arts Trust and social landlord Poplar HARCA, who found themselves working together on another project, made this vision a reality in East London. LSE London went in… Read More

Development of new cohousing: lessons from a London scheme for the over-50s

LSE London’s Kath Scanlon and Melissa Fernandez have recently published an article on the lessons learned from a south London co-housing scheme, Featherstone, which they have been researching for 3 years. The article can be accessed here.

PRS Profiles: The reality of private renting in London

This video is the introduction to a series of short films called PRS Profiles, which seeks to showcase the realities of private renting in London from the perspectives of renters themselves.

What is different about today’s big developments? Thoughts from a recent site visit

A visit to a large residential development site on the river in central London one recent morning raised a number of important issues about what enables successful development and what still constrains additional investment: First, large developments of apartments and associated infrastructure need off-plan sales to give the developer financial security. The larger the development the greater the need for these sales – as once the development is started it is extremely… Read More

ESRC seminar series explores the lessons and potential of co-housing

LSE London together with Newcastle University, UK Cohousing Network, University of Leeds, Lancaster University, Nottingham University, and University of Sheffield were awarded an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) seminar series grant to hold 6 seminars on co-housing between 2014-2016.

Workshop: Is foreign money necessary for accelerating housing development in London?

On February 19th – Chinese New Year – LSE London held a workshop on the potential role of international money in accelerating housing development in London. The conclusion was that foreign money can definitely help to bring forward development and in current conditions may well be the only way to achieve ambitious housing targets in London. However there are barriers to expanding their involvement, not least public attitudes to foreign buyers and… Read More

Housing Over the Airwaves: Nancy Holman and Christine Whitehead discuss the supply crisis on Radio 4

Housing in London: Addressing the Supply Crisis project officers Christine Whitehead and Nancy Holman both recently discussed the housing supply shortage on BBC Radio 4 programmes.

From our own corRUPSpondent: Marching for homes

From our own CorRUPSpondent – A series of blog posts written by students and alumni of the MSc Regional and Urban Planning Studies programme at the LSE. Author: Clementine Traynard On Saturday 31 January, I joined in thousands of Londoners for the first ever March for Homes. Our objective? “Better homes for Londoners and an end to the housing crisis” according to the Facebook event page. What a laudable, consensual cause. But is it a lost… Read More