Themes

Miliband’s proposals won’t do enough to benefit renters

Click here to access Christine Whitehead’s assessment of the Labour leader’s proposals on LSE’s British Politics and Policy Blog. She argues that Miliband’s proposals do not definitively deal with the issue, and that the private rented sectors needs to be addressed by more coherent, nuanced and evidence-based policies.

LSE experts submit joint response challenging Mayor’s Housing Strategy

A group of academics from LSE and other housing experts, hosted by LSE London, met in February to write a response to the Mayor of London’s draft plan to increase the supply of housing in the city. They argue that the plan lacks ‘a real strategy for bringing about the genuinely radical change’ needed to accommodate the number of households expected to form over the next decade – estimated at more than 50,000 per annum. Click here… Read More

Building the Rented Sector in Scotland

A report for Homes for Scotland by Christine Whitehead and Kath Scanlon of LSE London, Peter Williams of the Cambridge Centre for Housing Research, and Kenneth Gibb. Click here to read the report.

Creating Conditions for Growth

Christine Whitehead and Tony Travers along with Kath Scanlon and Melissa Fernandez of LSE London produced the report ‘Creating Conditions for Growth’ for Berkeley Group. It discusses the conditions necessary to stimulate house building, including the role played by foreign investment. Click here to read the report.

A Lifestyle Choice for Families? Private Renting in London, New York, Berlin and the Randstad

A research project by Kath Scanlon, Melissa Fernandez and Christine Whitehead of the London School of Economics and Political Science for Get Living London. Click here to access the report.  

About The Role of Foreign Money

International investment in the UK economy is normally highly prized. However international investment in residential property is at best regarded with suspicion and at worst seen as a disaster. The majority of statistics on the role of international investors in residential property come from the major estate agents and concentrate mainly on prime locations in central London. One big issue in understanding these statistics is that the definition of prime changes over… Read More

About Alternative Housing

London’s housing—of all tenures—is widely considered to be a sphere of growing inequality and unaffordability: it is the most expensive in the country, an increasing number of potential households cannot form because of the extent of housing pressure and there is far more overcrowding than elsewhere. The increased cost of home ownership and private renting has put them out of reach for many, while social housing and other accommodation options for the… Read More

About New Housing and the London Plan

London’s population in 2011 at 8.2 m only just exceeds the population in 1951 – but falling household size and much higher incomes means far more housing is required Between 2001 and 2011 the population grew by 14% but the number of households only went up by 8%, increasing densities to the point where household size rose for the first time (from 2.4 to 2.5) and headship rates among younger households fell… Read More

About Improving Private Renting

In 2011 some 26.5% of London dwellings were rented (vs 16.7% in the rest of England) —a near-doubling from 12.7% in 1991. The main drivers of this shift to private renting include London’s population growth (both natural and through migration), its age profile (the capital has higher proportions of young people and students than the rest of the country), and the fact that would-be first-time buyers face increasing house prices and tightened… Read More

Towards a Sustainable Private Rented Sector

This collection of research, edited by Kath Scanlon of LSE London and Ben Kochan, explores international models for operating larger, more sustainable private rented sectors. Click here to access the report.